Colchicine Colcrys

June 10, 2011 by Tim.

Colchicine (Colcrys)

Colchicine affects the way the body responds to uric acid crystals, which reduces swelling and pain.

Because colchicine was developed prior to federal regulations requiring FDA review of all marketed drug products, not all uses for colchicine have been approved by the FDA. As of 2009, Colcrys is the only brand of colchicine that has been approved by the FDA.

The Colcrys brand of colchicine is FDA-approved to treat gout in adults, and to treat a genetic condition called Familial Mediterranean Fever in adults and children who are at least 4 years old.

Generic forms of colchicine have been used to treat or prevent attacks of gout, or to treat symptoms of Behcets syndrome (such as swelling, redness, warmth, and pain).

Colchicine is not a cure for gouty arthritis or Behcets syndrome, and it will not prevent these diseases from progressing. Colchicine should not be used as a routine pain medication for other conditions.

To read the full article What is colchicine (Colcrys)? from eMedcineHealth.


Filed under: Gout and Pseudogout.

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Colchicine Gout

June 10, 2011 by Tim.

Cochicine Gout

Colchicine (Colcrys) is taken in tablet form (oral).

How Colchicine Works

Colchicine blocks the inflammation caused by uric acid crystals.

Why Colchicine Is Used

Colchicine has long been used to relieve acute gout attacks. It does not lower the level of uric acid. But in low doses, it does reduce the chance of future gout attacks.

Colchicine may be an option for some people who cannot take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

To help reduce the number and severity of gout attacks that can result when uric acid levels change suddenly, colchicine may be given at the same time as uricosuric medications, such as probenecid or sulfinpyrazone, which lower uric acid levels, or xanthine oxidase inhibitors, which block uric acid production.

Colchicine is avoided or used with caution in people who have:

Kidney disease.
Liver disease.
Inflammatory bowel disease.
A low white blood cell count.

To read the full article Colchicine for Gout from WebMD.


Filed under: Colchicine Use, Gout and Pseudogout.

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Colchicine Dosage

June 10, 2011 by Lynn.

Colchicine is available in .05, .06 and 1 mg colchicine tablets. Individual colchicine dosage is based on your medical condition, medical history and response to therapy, and should be decided by your doctor.

The usual initial dose of colchicine for gout during an acute attack is 1 or 1.2 mg. This initial dose is usually followed by half doses of the gout medication every hour or full doses every two hours until the pain is relieved, then lowered to .5 or .6 mg every two to three hours. The colchicine dosage may be lowered or stopped if the patient experiences gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea or diarrhea.

The colchicine dosage for gout prevention varies depending on individual circumstances and the number of gout attacks experienced, but is usually between .5 mg three times a week to .6 mg daily.

If you are taking colchicine regularly and you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. But if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose as usual - don't double dose. Colchicine.ca provides Colchicine images as below:


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Colchicine FDA

June 10, 2011 by Lynn.

Colchicine and FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Colcrys to treat acute flairs in patients with gout, a recurrent and painful form of arthritis, and patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), an inherited inflammatory disorder. The medication's active ingredient is colchicine, a complex compound derived from the dried seeds of a plant known as the autumn crocus or meadow saffron (Colchicum autumnale).

Colchicine has been used by healthcare practitioners for many years to treat gout but had not been approved by the FDA. The FDA has an initiative underway to bring unapproved, marketed products like colchicine under its regulatory framework. This initiative promotes the goal of assuring that all marketed drugs meet modern standards for safety, effectiveness, quality and labeling.

Physicians historically have given colchicine hourly for acute gout flares until the flare subsided or they had to stop treatment because the patient began experiencing gastrointestinal problems. A dosing study required as part of FDA approval demonstrated that one dose initially and a single additional dose after one hour was just as effective as continued hourly dosing for acute gout flares, but much less toxic. As a result, the drug is being approved for acute gout flares with the lower recommended dosing regimen.

The FDA is alerting healthcare professionals to this new dosing regimen and also warning about the potential for severe drug interactions when patients take colchicine.

Read the full article FDA Approves Colchicine for Acute Gout, Mediterranean Fever from FDA Press Announcements.


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Colchicine Side Effects

June 10, 2011 by Lynn.

Colchicine Side Effects

Colchicine should be taken with food and a full glass of water to reduce the possibility of side effects. The most common side effects of colchicine include loss of appetite and gastrointestinal upset such as stomach pain, vomiting and diarrhea. Drinking alcohol can increase the risk of stomach problems.

Less commonly, users may experience numbness or tingling in the hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy), muscle weakness, hair loss, or purpura (purple spots or patches caused by the leaking of small blood vessels).

On occasion, long-term users of colchicine may develop bone marrow depression resulting in poor blood clotting, anemia or neutropenia (low levels of white blood cells). People with neutropenia are more susceptible to bacterial infections.

Any side effects outside of mild gastrointestinal symptoms, loss of appetite and muscle pain or weakness should be reported to your doctor. As with any drug, signs of an allergic reaction such as rashes, itching, hives, or swelling of the face, lips, throat and tongue require immediate medical attention.

Colchicine is a powerful drug, and can be toxic at high doses. Symptoms of colchicine poisoning include fever, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain and burning in the mouth and throat. Symptoms usually occur with two to five hours of an overdose, but can take as long as 24 hours to appear. Severe overdose can progress to multiple organ failure, respiratory failure, and kidney damage. There is no antidote for colchicine poisoning, although there are treatments.

Grapefruit juice may increase the risk of colchicine toxicity, as can the use of cholesterol lowering drugs like statins and fibrates. Make sure your doctor is aware of all other prescription or over the counter medications you are using, especially HIV medications, antibiotics and antifungals. Also tell your doctor if you are regularly taking herbal medicines, sodium bicarbonate, vitamin C, or vitamin B12.

Ten to twenty percent of a dose of colchicine is secreted by the kidneys, so it should not be used long-term by anyone with poor renal functioning. It should also be avoided by those with serious gastrointestinal, blood, liver and cardiac disorders.

The effects of colchicine on pregnant or breastfeeding women have not been well studied.


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Is Gout Weed an Effective Gout Medication?

June 10, 2011 by Lynn.

Goutweed gained its name through its use as a medicinal plant to treat gout and other forms of arthritis. In fact, its name is derived from the Latin word for gout, podagra. It's also known by many other names over the world, including ground elder, bishop's weed, snow in the mountain, herb gerard and pigweed.

According to the old and revered Culpepper Complete Herbal, "Neither is it to be supposed gout-wort hath its name for nothing but upon experiment to heal the gout and sciatica; as also joint-aches, and other cold griefs. The very bearing of it about one eases the pain of the gout, and defends him that bears it from the disease."

Goutweed's ability to lower uric acid levels has not been substantially studied, but any benefit as a gout medication may lie in its properties as a diuretic. It's also believed to have sedative and anti-inflammatory properties. A homeopathic remedy for arthritis, rheumatism and sciatica is made from the flowering plant.

Goutweed is a perennial plant in the carrot family. It's native to Europe and Russia (excluding Spain) and is believed to have been brought to England as a food plant by the Romans. Monks cultivated it as a healing herb in the Middle Ages, giving it the name herb Gerard in dedication to St. Gerard, who used it to treat gout. It is still frequently found around many old ecclesiastical ruins.

Both the stalk and the leaves of goutweed have been used as a gout medicine through the ages, internally and externally. It is most commonly used as a tea, or mashed into a paste and applied to painful joints as a poultice. The young leaves are boiled and eaten as a vegetable in Sweden and Switzerland, or eaten raw in a spring salad. It is also eaten by Chinese and Tibetan monks. Later in the season, the leaves have a strong flavor that most people find unpleasant. The white root stalk is described as pungent and aromatic.

Goutweed grows about 12 to 18 inches high, with large leaves, furrowed hollow stems and numerous small white flowers. It spreads so rapidly and determinedly that it is considered to be a major garden weed. Goutweed is so invasive it is almost impossible to eradicate once the roots have taken hold.


Filed under: Gout Medications, Gout Natural Remedies.

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About Gout

June 10, 2011 by Lena.

What is Gout?

Gout, or gouty arthritis, is an overload of uric acid in the body, often brought about by the body's inability to process uric acid. The excess uric acid causes crystals of urate to build up in the body's tissues, especially the joints, which causes inflammation. Gout is a chronic illness, and progressive, meaning that it gets worse over time if not treated properly. Aside from the joint pain, gout can cause lumps of urate to build up in the kidneys leading to kidney stones or even kidney failure.

Who Does it Affect and Why?

Gout shows up often in history books as an affliction of the affluent, but its designation as a rich man's disease is not entirely accurate.. Gout affects approximately 5 million people in the United States, and while it does affect men nine times more than women it is not exclusive to the upper class. Gout hits usually after puberty, with a peak age of 75 in men, and generally after menopause in women. Obesity and high blood pressure are contributing risk factors in developing gout, as are certain medications. Diet plays a huge role in development and control of gout — a diet rich in meat and fish and with a moderate to high alcohol intake can increase chances of gouty arthritis. Maintaining a diet low in foods containing purines is important in controlling gout, as uric acid is produced when breaking down purines.

Symptoms

Gout affects the joints of the body, most commonly the joint at the base of the big toe. Attacks of gouty arthritis generally present as pain and swelling at the affected site, along with redness, warmth and tenderness. Gout attacks generally last for a few hours to a few days, and will subside without medication. Unlike rheumatoid arthritis, which usually attacks multiple joints at once, gout usually flares up in one joint at a time. The most reliable way to diagnose gout is to check a sample of joint fluid for uric acid crystals.

Treatment

Anti-inflammatory medications, ibuprofen and acetaminophen can be used to relieve pain during a gout attack, and gout medications such as corticosteroids or colchicine can be used to reduce swelling. Aspirin should be avoided for pain relief as it can prevent the kidneys from excreting uric acid. Gout medications are available to control levels of uric acid, but they are usually only given after the acute attack has finished, as taking these medications during the attack can make it worse. Along with medications for gout, diet changes and weight loss can help control attacks and lower uric acid levels.


Filed under: What is Gout.

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Gout Tophi

June 10, 2011 by Lynn.

A tophus (plural: tophi) is a deposit or lump of uric acid crystals that forms in people with gout, a type of arthritis. Tophus means "stone" in Latin. Gout is a condition where the body has overly high levels of uric acid in the blood, either because it can not rid itself of, or produces too much uric acid.

Uric acid is a naturally occurring chemical produced when the body breaks down purines, an organic compound found in the body and in most foods. In normal quantities, uric acid is a natural and healthy antioxidant, helping to prevent damage to blood vessels.

But when too much uric acid circulates in the blood it builds up, forming painful needle-like crystals and, in some cases, knobby, chalky lumps called tophi. Uric acid can also accumulate in the kidneys, causing kidney stones, or, less frequently, in the tendons or other organs.

It's estimated about 25 percent of people with gout will eventually develop tophi. Tophi usually take many years to develop, appearing about 10 years after the onset of untreated or poorly managed gout, although they may appear earlier or later. They appear most often in the elderly, especially elderly women.

Tophi can form under the skin or in the joints, bones and cartilage. They commonly occur on the ears, fingers, toes, ankle and elbow. They first form as movable lumps, and become whitish and painful as they grow bigger. Gout sufferers often develop more than one tophi.

If allowed to continue to grow, tophi can deform and destroy joints and cartilage. They can also become infected and burst, oozing through the skin or causing a life threatening bacterial infection in the blood.

Tophi can be reabsorbed into the body if uric acid levels are decreased. Therefore they are treated by reducing the body's level of uric acid with gout medication. This can take months, or even years. Febuxostat (brand name Uloric) and pegloticase (brand name Krystexxa) are two of the most effective uric acid reducing tophi and gout medications.

Gout medications must be taken with care however, as the reabsorption of a tophus can raise uric acid levels in the blood, precipitating a gout attack. In some cases, tophi will need to be removed surgically.


Filed under: Gout Arthritis.

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Cherries Prove an Effective Gout Medication

June 10, 2011 by Lynn.

Gout is a form of arthritis caused by elevated levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia). The excess uric acid forms painful crystals in joints, tendons and surrounding tissues, causing recurring attacks of red, tender, hot, swollen and extremely painful joints, usually the joint at the base of the big toe. Other joints such as the ankles, heels, knees, fingers and wrists can also be affected, and crystals occasionally appear in the kidneys. Fatigue and fever sometimes accompany gout attacks.

Gout is caused by a combination of genetic and lifestyle factors. Dietary factors account for about 12% of gout, especially drinking alcohol and fructose-laden drinks and eating red meat and seafood. Gout is also associated with obesity, weight gain, high blood pressure, diabetes, lead poisoning, abnormal kidney function, joint trauma and surgery. Certain medications can also contribute to gout.

Until recently, it was believed that purine rich foods like asparagus, cauliflower, mushrooms, yeast, organ meats and legumes made gout worse, but recent studies found that's not the case. Some foods are known to help alleviate gout, including berries, bananas, pineapple, leafy green vegetables, low fat dairy products, complex carbohydrates, foods high in vitamin C, chocolate, coffee and tea.

One encouraging study discovered that people with gout cut their repeated attacks almost in half just by eating 20 cherries a day. Good quality cherry extract, found in health food stores, was also an effective gout medicine. The finding reinforces years of anecdotal reports from patients who attested to the beneficial effects of cherry juice for gout.

Doctors take a three-pronged approach to treating gout, prescribing different gout medications to 1) manage pain, 2) decrease joint inflammation, and 3) reduce uric acid to avoid future flare ups. Analgesics such as acetaminophen are used to manage the pain, while the NSAID Indocin (indomethacin) is the most commonly prescribed anti inflammatory medication.

Colchicine has been the standard of treatment for the acute stage of gout since the 1800s. Colchicine for gout is taken orally to both reduce inflammation and to prevent future gouty arthritis attacks. Corticosteroids such as prednisone are powerful anti inflammatory drugs that may also be administered for acute gout.

Under excretion of uric acid by the kidneys accounts for about 90% of hyperuricemia, while overproduction of uric acid accounts for fewer than 10% of cases. Medications to lower uric acid such as Zyloprim (allopurinol) or Uloric (generic febuxostat) are prescribed after the flare up has passed to help prevent further attacks. Since it received FDA approval for the chronic management of hyperuricemia in 2009, febuxostat has been prescribed increasingly over allopurinol. Febuxostat has been shown to be more effective in shrinking uric acid deposits, and not as likely to impact on kidney function.

Thanks to the effectiveness of today's gout medications, gout treatment is considered a modern medical success story - good news for America's 5 million sufferers.


Filed under: Gout Medications, Gout Natural Remedies.

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Get Fit To Fight Gout

June 14, 2011 by Frankie.

Gout, the oldest and most common form of arthritis, may have a cool medicinal pedigree, but to you it's just a painful reminder that you need to lower your uric acid or find a gout treatment like an anti-inflammatory medication STAT (immediately!). Unlike some other painful ailments, you CAN control this disease. Here are some simple steps to keep gouty arthritis from keeping you laid up, foot throbbing in agony.

Eat Well

The first step to avoid a gouty arthritis attack is to watch what you're eating. This works on many levels. First off, if you're making healthy food choices, your weight should stay in check. Eating fresh fruits and vegetables that are low in calories and high in vitamins and minerals will help you either lose or maintain a healthy weight. Studies show that if you lose weight you increase your chances of eliminating or reducing both the frequency and intensity of gout attacks. The only caution here is if you are on a diet, be sure to not make it a crash diet as it's both unhealthy and taxing on your body, and also by losing weight too rapidly you increase your percentage of uric acid in your system in the short term.

Other than more produce, the best way to alter your diet to treat gout is avoid foods that are high in purines. Purines turn into uric acid, which can accumulate in your joints leading to painful attacks. The main offenders, or purine perpetrators, are the following foods and beverages: bacon, hot dogs, game food, poultry, beer, fish and shellfish, peas and legumes, and mushrooms and asparagus. Avoid these delicious but dastardly foods to help lower uric acid.

Exercise

The next logical step to keep gout at bay is to combine healthy eating with exercise to stay healthy, limber and lose weight. If you haven't done a regular exercise regime before, be sure to consult your doctor first and take it easy. Just as you shouldn't crash diet, you should exercise in moderation. Going too hard too fast can cause damage to your joints and may actually trigger a gout attack.

Not only can exercise keep you at a healthy weight, when you exercise you increase the amount of synovial fluid that flows through your joints. This synovial fluid helps flush the uric acid out of your joints. This will help reduce gout attacks over time.

Stay Hydrated

The final simple step to staying healthy and well-oiled internally to avoid gout attacks is to ensure you drink enough water. Most adults don't drink enough water in a day, or they drink sodas high in sugar and calories when they're thirsty. Ideally you should be taking in 8 glasses of 8 oz each of water per day, especially after exercising. When you have your water accompanying a meal it will assist in filling you up so that you aren't tempted to overeat, which will help you keep weight off.

Water is your first gout medication, as it is vital to helping you prevent gout.Drinking plenty of water helps your body function more efficiently, which allows your renal system to process the uric acid out of your system. Another benefit of being well hydrated is it helps your joints to work better which will keep them healthier and less susceptible to damage from the uric acid.

If you have made a determined effort to change to a healthier lifestyle, are eating the right foods, exercising regularly and drinking enough water and still have a gout attack, there is a quick way to treat gout and that is a gout medication. An anti-inflammatory drug like prescription Colcrys, and its equivalent generic colchicine tablets, can be affective in helping to treat gout. It is considerably cheaper to buy colchicine and Colcrys online from a licensed Canadian pharmacy. Really, it's all good news. The steps you take to avoid painful gout attacks are also the steps to a healthier, happier lifestyle.


Filed under: Gout Food Diet, Gout Natural Remedies.

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Gout Diet

June 14, 2011 by Lynn.

Diet is a key factor in controlling gouty arthritis as it can help to lower uric acid levels and prevent flare ups. The combination of a healthy diet, weight loss, and gout medications is vital for lowering the risk of gout attacks.

Foods to Avoid

Gout is caused by high levels of uric acid, which is produced during the breakdown of purines. Purines are found in many foods, and to lower uric acid levels those foods should be restricted. In the past a low-protein diet has been recommended, but studies have since shown that overall protein levels do not affect the chances of getting gouty arthritis, but the type of protein being consumed does. Meat and seafood, in particular, are the culprits.

One study found that the men who ate the most meat were 40 percent more likely to get gout, and the men who ate the most seafood were 50 percent more likely to be afflicted. Some meats and seafood have higher purine levels (such as liver, herring and anchovies), but all animal protein contains purines.

While it is not necessary to completely eliminate meat and seafood as part of the diet, it is recommended that intake be restricted. Alcohol consumption should be limited as well, especially during an attack. While a glass of wine with dinner is not likely to increase your risk of gout, drinking beer will.

Foods to Include

Cutting out purine-rich foods is the first step in preventing attacks of gouty arthritis, but there are also foods that are beneficial to eat. Replace animal proteins with vegetable-based proteins like legumes and tofu as often as possible.

Be sure to include lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and choose low-fat dairy products, as research shows it can be helpful in preventing attacks. Make sure to drink lots of water to help flush out the body and stay hydrated. A well-rounded diet, much like the diet recommended for cardiovascular disease, can do wonders in helping facilitate weight loss and prevent in painful attacks of gout.

Because obesity is a contributing factor in developing gout, combining diet and exercise to achieve a healthy weight is important in preventing and managing gouty arthritis. With the right balance of gout medications, diet and exercise, gouty arthritis can be kept under control and the chances of a gout attack can be kept at a minimum.


Filed under: Gout Food Diet.

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Alternative Gout Treatments

June 15, 2011 by Lynn.

Gout treatment centers on lowering the amount of uric acid in the body. Most gout sufferers achieve this through the use of prescription gout medication, but some swear by alternative methods. Others claim they get the best results with a combination of gout meds and an alternative treatment.

A long-time home remedy for gout is a half-teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) in a large glass of water, four times a day. As baking soda is alkaline, it is believed to raise the body's ph level. Alkalinizing the blood is said to lessen its ability to hold uric acid. Some claim it starts working immediately, while others get relief between 24 hours and a week.

Be aware that the baking soda treatment should only be tried with your doctor's approval. Baking soda is high in sodium, and can raise blood pressure, as can gout. It can also cause side effects such as headaches, nausea, vomiting and stomach pain.

Baking soda should not be taken by those with appendicitis, or heart, kidney or liver disease. If you take too much baking soda for too long, you can develop a condition called alkalosis, in which the ph of your tissues is elevated. For more information on baking soda for gout, visit Best Gout Remedies.

Goutweed has been used as a gout medicine through the ages, internally and externally. It is used as a tea, or mashed into a paste and applied to painful joints as a poultice. It's believed to have diuretic, sedative and anti-inflammatory properties.

Herbs said to be good for lowering uric acid include Devil's claw, yucca, and banaba, a medicinal flower from the Philippines. The spice tumeric is thought to be a natural anti-inflammatory and antioxidant. Many herbs can interact with other medications, so only use them in consultation with your health care professional.

Omega 3 fish oils (EPA/DHA) in fish oil supplements are precursors of anti inflammatory prostagladins, and may help reduce gout inflammation. Supplements are a better source than fish, as fish can be high in purines. Taking omega 6 oils in combination with omega 3s boosts the anti inflammatory effect.

A number of foods and beverages are recommended for any natural gout treatment plan, including:

Gout sufferers should always take a good quality vitamin and mineral supplement, as many gout medications deplete the body of vitamins and minerals. Several studies have demonstrated vitamin C can lower uric acid levels, preferably combined with the flavonoid rutin. The effect is mild, so it's best used in combination with other treatments.


Filed under: Alternative Gout Treatment.

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Gout Resource Includes Educational Slideshow and Quiz

June 17, 2011 by Lynn.

EmedicineHealth.com has created a comprehensive and easy to understand 14-page online gout guide. Written by medical doctors, the educational resource provides comprehensive information on gout signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, gout medications, gout prevention, gout prognosis, and more.

The consumer health information site, part of the WebMD network, features an informative gout quiz, and a helpful gout slideshow illustrating typical gouty arthritis attacks.

To visit the eMedicineHealth.com gout guide, >CLICK HERE<.


Filed under: Gout Quiz, Gout Resources.

Tags: gout information, gout treatment and prevention, gout medication, colchicine, colchicine information, buy colchicine, colchicine canada.


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Managing Gout with Diet

June 20, 2011 by Lynn.

Gout has been called "the disease of kings" and "the rich man's disease" because of its association with a diet high in red meat and alcohol. Gout is caused by high levels of uric acid in the blood. Uric acid is the by-product of the breakdown of purines in the body.

Purines are naturally occurring substances found in all the body's cells and almost all foods, especially protein and yeast rich foods like meat and wine. As cells break down and renew themselves over time, the purines contained in the cells break down and form uric acid.

In normal quantities, uric acid is a natural and healthy antioxidant, helping to prevent damage to blood vessels. But when too much uric acid circulates in the blood, it builds up in and around the joint (usually the big toe), forming needle-like crystals which trigger the painful inflammation of gout.

Foods to Avoid
Avoiding purine rich foods plays a major role in managing and preventing gout. Fatty meat and fish should be avoided, and daily consumption of lean meat, fish and poultry should be limited to 4 to 6 ounces. Purine rich foods known to cause or worsen gout are usually high protein foods, including:

- red meat like beef and venison
- organ meats like liver and kidneys
- oily fish like salmon, sardines, mackerel and herring
- shellfish such as mussels and scallops
- fatty cheeses
- eggs
- peas, kidney and lima beans and lentils
- asparagus, spinach and mushrooms
- yeasty foods like marmite spread and some baked goods
- sweetened drinks

For a more complete list of purine-rich foods, refer to Gout Causing Foods on Buzzle.com.

Alcohol should be avoided or drank in moderation, especially yeasty, purine containing drinks like beer and wine. Alcohol has diuretic effects that can lead to dehydration and trigger gout attacks. Alcohol also slows down the excretion of uric acid from the kidneys, contributing to the formation of painful uric acid crystals in the joints.

It's very important for gout sufferers to drink 6 to 8 glasses of water to dilute the high levels of uric acid in their systems. Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight is also important, as excess pounds increase stress on the joints.

Foods to Enjoy
Gout patients benefit from a low purine, low fat diet rich in complex carbohydrates such as whole grain pasta, bread and rice. Foods high in vitamin C can help reduce uric acid levels. Some of the best foods and drinks for a gout diet are:

- Cherries and cherry juice (especially black cherries)
- Cranberries and cranberry juice
- Lime juice
- Fresh fruit, especially apples, red grapes, pineapples, bananas, oranges, blueberries and strawberries
- Low fat dairy products
- Red and green cabbage
- Green, leafy vegetables
- Celery
- Garlic
- Red peppers
- Honey, in combination with equal amounts of apple cider vinegar
- Essential fatty acids (found in seeds, nuts, flaxseed, and many oils)

A popular home remedy gout medicine is a half-teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) in a large glass of water, four times a day. As baking soda is alkaline, it is believed to raise the body's ph level. Alkalinizing the blood is said to lessen its ability to hold uric acid. Baking soda should only be tried with your doctor's approval, as it is high in sodium, and can raise blood pressure and cause other side effects in some people.

Knowing which foods and beverages to avoid and which to eat is vital to managing gout. Gout sufferers will find that adherence to a healthy gout diet will lessen or eliminate their need for gout medication like anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine for gout. Gout sufferers should always take a good quality vitamin and mineral supplement, as some gout medications may deplete the body of vitamins and minerals.


Filed under: Gout Food Diet.

Tags: gout diet, gout food, gout causes, gout medications, colchicine for gout, colchicine, buy colchicine, gout treatment and prevention, colchicine information.


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Four Common Gout Triggers

June 23, 2011 by Frankie.

For long-term sufferers of gout - a kind of arthritis that occurs when uric acid builds up in the joints - being aware of what can trigger a gouty attack is key. After all, the pain that comes from the uric acid crystals forming - which cause the joint to swell up and become inflamed - can range from throbbing to excruciating. If you've ever had more than one gout attack chances are you know what triggered it.

Gout triggers are the immediate conditions that cause gout flare ups, but like a lot of medical conditions that aren't cut and dry, every gout flare up isn't necessarily caused by them. And you may have your own unique triggers, including particular foods that bring on attacks for you but not others. Finding out what your triggers are is a significant and incredibly useful job - most long-term gout sufferers get to learn them over time. The four most common triggers of gouty arthritis attacks are listed below.

Obesity - We all know being overweight has many health hazards. It can raise your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, sleep apnea, high blood pressure - and yes, gout. The larger your body, the more uric acid it has to excrete. More uric acid equals a surefire gout trigger.

Weather - Unfortunately both ends of the weather spectrum can be trouble for the gout sufferer. In very cold weather, its best to wear warm clothes including gloves, as fingers are where gout attacks may last longest and be the most difficult to control. On your feet thick wool socks are best as gout is most likely to start in one of the big toes. Both the feet and the fingers are the coldest parts of the body as they're the furthest from the heart. Really, it's best to avoid being outside during cold weather as much as possible.

Conversely, very hot and humid weather can also trigger gout flare-ups, most likely because it causes dehydration. Ensure you drink plenty of water in very hot weather, or if you live in a hot and humid climate.

Excessive Food and Alcohol Consumption - The most common immediate cause of gout is over consumption of alcohol and high purine foods. Alcohol is a major immediate cause of gout for three reasons. It is a major source of purines - the building blocks of uric acid; it stimulates the liver to break down purines and thus produce more uric acid; and it affects the kidney's ability to remove uric acid.

Foods that are highest in purines are seafood like herrings, sardines and anchovies, liver and pates, organ meats, and baker's yeast. The alcohol highest in purines is the country's most beloved brew - beer. Basically, binging on the foods listed above and your favorite bottle can cause a rapid change of blood uric acid levels and be a gout trigger. As with most things in life, moderation really is key.

Overall, what do all the triggers listed have in common? They are any event or substance that causes a rapid change in blood (serum) uric acid. So, if you've triggered an attack, now what? Ultimately you need to lower uric acid in your body.

Anti-inflammatory medications like prescription Colcrys, and its cheaper equivalent generic colchicine can help reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation. With a valid doctor's prescription indicating the correct colchicine dosage, you can buy colchicine for gout online from Canada. Many licensed Canadian pharmacies provide a cheaper alternative for gout medication.

Once you have a handle on your own gout triggers and have gout medication on hand to help ease your symptoms, you'll be fast on the road to recovering from your gout attack.


Filed under: Gout Risk.

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Pseudogout

June 23, 2011 by Lynn.

Pseudogout or "false gout" presents similar symptoms to gout such as pain, swelling, heat, redness and stiffness in the affected area. Like gout, pseudogout affects the joints, most commonly the knees, but also the toes, feet, hands, wrists, arms and shoulders. Also as with gout, there are symptom-free remission periods between attacks.

Although the symptoms are so similar, pseudogout is an entirely different condition than gout. It is even possible to have gout and pseudogout at the same time. While gout primarily affects men over 30 and the occasional post-menopausal woman, pseudogout affects both sexes equally as they age. Pseudogout is occasionally misdiagnosed as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.

Although both gout and pseudogout are forms of arthritis, they have one main distinguishing characteristic. While gout is caused by needle-like crystals of uric acid building up in the fluid surrounding the joints, pseudogout is caused by a build up of calcium pyrophosphate crystals - a form of salt. Because of this, pseudogout is sometimes referred to as calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease, or CPPD disease. While the calcium deposits cause gout-like symptoms, they do not form gout tophi as uric acid crystals do.

Attacks of pseudogout are often precipitated by dehydration, commonly occurring in elderly patients following surgery. It can also be associated with an injury or illness, including hormonal disorders, hemophilia, hemochromatosis, ochronosis, and amyloidsis. The condition can also be inherited.

A diagnosis is made by examining fluid drawn from the joint to determine if it contains uric acid crystals or crystals of calcium pyrophosphate. As well, x-rays of the affected joint may reveal calcium deposits or calcification of cartilage. Pseudogout's tendency to calcify cartilage can cause permanent joint and nerve damage if left untreated.

It's not known what causes pseudogout. Like gout, there is no cure or preventative treatment, but most patients respond well to treatment. Applying ice and resting the affected joint can help reduce inflammation and dull the pain.

Pseudogout can be treated with NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors, oral and injected corticosteroids, dietary changes and draining of the affected joint. Colchicine is often prescribed for both treatment of acute attacks and long-term prevention of recurrent attacks.


Filed under: Gout and Pseudogout.

Tags: gout arthritis, pseudogout, false gout, gout treatment, gout pain relief, colchicine medication, buy colchicine, colchicine colcyrs.


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Fructose Rich Beverages Associated With Increased Risk of Gout in Women

June 24, 2011 by Lynn.

Fructose-rich beverages associated with increased risk of gout in women
ScienceDaily (2010-11-10) -- Consumption of fructose-rich beverages, such as sugar-sweetened sodas and orange juice is associated with an increased risk of gout among women, although their contribution to the risk of gout in the population is likely modest because of the low incidence rate among women, according to a new study. ... > read full article


Filed under: Gout Risk.

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Test Your Knowledge With a Gout Quiz

June 27, 2011 by Lynn.

About.com has created a comprehensive online Gout Quiz to test your knowledge of gout causes, symptoms, prevention and treatment, including gout medications. The 18-question quiz is both engaging and educational. To find out just how much you know (or don't know) about gout, visit the About.com Gout Quiz. You might be surprised at what you learn!


Filed under: Gout Quiz.

Tags: colchicine, colchicine information, gout treatment, gout treatment, gout causes and symptoms, gout medications, colchicine for gout, colchicine.ca.


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Scientists Eradicate Gout in Mice

June 27, 2011 by Lynn.

Researchers from the Swiss natural science and engineering university ETH Zurich have developed a self regulating biological gene network that they believe will make gout and kidney stones a thing of the past.

As humans evolved, we lost an enzyme that helps control levels of uric acid in the body. The enzyme, urate oxydase, is still present in most mammals, working to keep their uric acid in check. Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down purines. Purines are natural substances found in all cells and almost all foods.

In the right quantity, uric acid is a powerful anti-oxidant and an important part of the detoxification process. But when blood levels get too high (over 6.8 mg/dl), the excess uric acid crystallizes into needle sharp crystals in the joints and tissues surrounding the joints, causing a painful form of arthritis known as gout. Excess uric acid can also be deposited in the kidneys as kidney stones.

Determined to reconstruct a system to keep uric acid in check in humans, the ETH researchers put together a biological network of genes they call UREX. The network has three components: a uric acid sensor that constantly monitors uric acid levels, a genetic circuit, and a component that releases urate oxydase into the blood.

The three components are programmed to perform certain functions both independently and in synch with each other, without any outside assistance. When the sensor detects high concentrations of uric acid, it automatically relays that information to the genetic circuit, which triggers the third component to release urate oxydase to lower uric acid levels to a healthy balance.

Amazingly, the gene network is contained in a single cell. Roughly two million of these cells are enclosed in a tiny implantable porous gelatin capsule for protection against an immune system attack. The implant can be removed at any time with no consequence.

ETH Zurich Professor Martin Fussenegger says the "molecular prosthesis" is a prime example of what can be achieved using synthetic biology. "Many medical problems are solved by introducing chemical substances [like gout medication] into the body from outside," he explains, "In our method, we repair a defective metabolic pathway and help the body to treat itself in the best possible way."

UREX has been successfully tested in mice, and the research team has filed a patent application for the gene network. Other partners are now responsible for bringing UREX to market. Fussenegger is confident that UREX will successfully complete the necessary testing in the near future, clearing the way for a finished product to hit the world market - a major development with potential to bring relief to millions of gout sufferers around the world who now rely on gout medication.


Filed under: Gout Resources.

Tags: gout medication, gout treatment, colchicine, colchicine colcyrs, colchicine gout, colchicine information, colchicine medications, colchicine canada.


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Gout Treatment and Prevention

June 28, 2011 by Lynn.

While gout is usually a chronic and progressive disease, there are effective gout treatments. Gout treatment is two-pronged, concentrating first on relieving the pain and inflammation of an attack, and then on preventing future attacks and accompanying complications.

Painkillers, anti-inflammatories and corticosteroids target the pain and inflammation, while uric acid blockers or reducers are prescribed as preventatives. A prescription gout medication called colchicine can treat gout in two different ways, at higher doses to treat the pain and inflammation of an acute attack, or at lower doses to prevent recurring attacks.

Some general advice:

The first line of defense is to take a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as naproxen (Aleve), ibuprofen (Advil), indometacin (Indocin), or the newer celecoxib (Celebrex). These will ease most gout attacks in a day or two. If you have asthma, heart failure, high blood pressure or kidney problems, talk to your doctor before taking anti-inflammatories.

If anti-inflammatories don't work well enough, or you are unable to take them, your doctor will likely prescribe colchicine (Colcrys). Colchicine is an extract from a plant called the autumn crocus, also known as meadow saffron. While the persistent use of colchicine can reduce the attacks of gout, it does not prevent the accumulation of uric acid that can lead to joint damage even without attacks of hot, swollen joints.

Colchicine has been widely used in many countries since the 1930's, and was FDA approved in combination with probenicid (a gout medication which increases uric acid excretion) in the early 1980's. Colchicine was approved as a solitary gout treatment in 2009 under the brand name Colcrys.

Oral corticosteroids such as prednisone are also used to treat gout. Corticoseroids can also be injected directly into the affected joint to rapidly reduce inflammation and relieve pain. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed short-term because of potential side effects if used for a long time.

Allopurinal may be prescribed for chronic gout. Allopurinal is used to prevent, but not treat, gout attacks. It works by lowering the level of uric acid in the blood. Allopurinal must be taken daily, and may take 2 to 3 months to become effective.

It's important not to take allopurinal during a gout attack, but to wait until it has subsided. That's because it may cause an initial increase in uric acid levels, precipitating or worsening a gout attack.

Probenecid is another uric acid lowering medication that is sometimes prescribed in addition to low dose colchicine. Probenecid helps eliminate excess uric acid through the kidneys into the urine. It's important to drink lots of water when taking probenecid to prevent the formation of kidney stones. Some medications should not be taken along with probenecid, so make sure your doctor is aware of any other drugs you are taking.

Febuxostat is a newer preventative gout medication marketed as Uloric. It was developed specifically to treat gout by decreasing the body's formation of uric acid. It is suitable for patients with impaired kidney function.


Filed under: Gout Treatment and Prevention, Gout Medications.

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Anticipated New Gout Medication Unlikely to Win FDA Approval

June 29, 2011 by Lynn.

Gout sufferers awaiting the approval of Novartis' highly anticipated new gout medication Ilaris are likely in for disappointment. An FDA Advisory Committee recommended against approving the gout medication this week, citing concerns about the shortness of the clinical trials (12 weeks) and unanswered questions about possible long-term side effects.

Ilaris (generic name canakinumab) is an injectable anti-inflammatory drug currently approved to treat a rare inflammatory disorder. Ilaris injections exceeded researchers' expectations as a gouty arthritis pain reliever in two clinical trials, relieving pain more than an existing gout drug, the corticosteroid triamcinolone, and reducing the occurrence of flare ups.

"Our findings indicate that canakinumab 150 mg provides rapid and sustained pain relief in patients with acute gouty arthritis, and significantly reduces the risk of recurrent flares compared with triamcinolone acttonide," Swiss researchers enthused in a 2010 issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism after conducting Novartis supported research.

But the anti-inflammatory gout medication was also linked to twice as many potentially serious side effects than triamcinolone (7% compared to 3%). As well, serious infections developed in two study participants taking Ilaris, versus no infections in the group taking the older anti-inflammatory. The gout drug also elevated levels of uric acid and some forms of cholesterol. Ilaris was not tested in older patients or in people with renal failure.

The panel was not satisfied that the benefits of the proposed gout medication outweighed the risks. As Ilaris suppresses the immune system, the panel worried about the risk of infection in patients using it long term. Their decision was complicated by the fact that the effects of a single injection are long-lasting, making them more difficult to measure.

The FDA is not bound by panel recommendations, but usually makes their final decisions based on them. Nobody will be more disappointed than Novartis should the new gout medicine fail to win approval, as they have been anticipating huge sales from both gout and rheumatoid arthritis sufferers. Novartis estimated that 300,000 gout sufferers alone might make the switch from their current gout medications.

The manufacturer will now likely have to satisfy the FDA that the gout drug is safe for long-term use, possibly at a lower dose. "We continue to believe in the benefits of [Ilaris] for this painful and debilitating disease, and will work closely with the FDA to identify the right patient population who will benefit from this therapy," Novartis wrote in a press release, adding they "remain committed to addressing the needs of people with gouty arthritis."


Filed under: Gout Medications.

Tags: gout medication, gout prescription drugs, colchicine colcyrs, colchicine fda, colchicine information, colchicine canada.


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Colchicine from Canada

June 29, 2011 by Lynn.

Because colchicine has been in use since before the inception of the FDA in the 1960s, it - like many other commonly prescribed drugs including morphine and nitroglycerine - never went through the formal FDA review and approval process. The FDA considers such untested and unapproved medications a potential risk to consumers.

In 2006, the FDA began pressuring companies manufacturing the older unapproved medications to put them through expensive clinical trials to win formal FDA approval. In return, the companies were offered exclusive market rights for a time period, to allow them to recoup their investment.

URL Pharma successfully underwent the rigorous approval process and received exclusive rights to market its brand name colchicine, Colcrys, in 2009. The FDA awarded URL Pharma the rights to market colchicine for gout for three years, and for familial Mediterranean fever for seven years. In 2010, over twenty other US pharmaceutical companies were ordered to stop manufacturing the gout drug within 45 days, and to stop shipping it within 90 days.

The price of one colchicine tablet soared from 9 cents to almost $5, a move that is projected to increase state Medicaid costs for the gout drug from $1 million to $50 million. In response to a public outcry, including pointed queries from Members of Congress, URL Pharma has expanded its patient assistance and co-pay programs to allow price breaks for those hardest hit.

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) protested the steep increase as unjustified, and encouraged other pharmaceutical companies to enter the market with their own branded version of colchicine. In early 2010, the ACR announced that a second manufacturer would be seeking FDA approval.

Colchicine from Canada

Generic colchicine continues to be manufactured and sold cheaply in Canada. Gout patients should be aware that they can buy colchicine from Canada, along with brand Colcrys. A three-month supply of colchicine for gout can be ordered through an online Canadian pharmacy with a current valid prescription.

Online Canadian pharmacies are rushing to woo American customers with stepped up advertising, discounted prices and pharmacy savings coupons. For example, the Canadian pharmacy Big Mountain Drugs is offering 100 .5 mg generic colchicine tablets for $29 US, along with a 5% pharmacy rewards program and a $5 pharmacy savings coupon on a partner site, onlinepharmacycoupons.com.


Filed under: Cochicine Canada.

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Colchicine for Gout

June 29, 2011 by Lynn.

If anti-inflammatories don't work well enough, or you are unable to take them, your doctor will likely prescribe colchicine (brand name Colcrys). The name colchicine comes from the Greek word for autumn crocus, kolchikon. The autumn crocus, also known as meadow saffron, has been used as a gout medication for about 2000 years. The medicine is derived from the dried seeds or bulb - the rest of the plant is highly poisonous.

Colchicine was first isolated from the autumn crocus in 1820. The colchicine mechanism of action is different from other painkilling and anti-inflammatory drugs. Colchicine acts by binding to a small globular protein called tubulin and interfering with immune system first-responder inflammatory white cells called neutrophils, reducing inflammation.

Colchicine has both pain relieving and anti-inflammatory effects, although it's most powerful as an anti-inflammatory. Therefore, colchicine can treat gout in two different ways, at higher doses to treat the pain and inflammation of an acute attack, or at lower doses to prevent recurring attacks. While colchicine can reduce the attacks of gout, it does not prevent the accumulation of uric acid that can lead to gout attacks and joint damage.

It has been widely available as colchicine tablets since the 1930's, and was FDA approved in combination with probenicid (a gout medication which increases uric acid excretion) in the early 1980's. Colchicine was approved as a solitary gout drug in 2009 under the brand name Colcrys.

Colchicine can also be administered intravenously, but IV use should be restricted to hospitalized patients under the care of a doctor because of the potential for toxicity.

Colchicine is best known as an effective gout medication, but it is also used to treat pseudogout, and has been approved for the treatment of familiar Mediterranean fever (FMF). FMF is a rare inherited disorder that causes recurring attacks of fever and inflammation. Less commonly, colchicine is prescribed to treat amyloidosis, cirrhosis, pericarditis, Paget's Disease and Behcet's Disease.

Some naturopaths use the gout medication off-label as a treatment for a number of conditions, including back pain. Colchicine can also be used in combination with another anti-inflammatory to treat irritable bowel syndrome, and is being investigated as a treatment for cancer.

Colchicine Dosage

Colchicine is available in .05, .06 and 1 mg colchicine tablets. Individual colchicine dosage is based on your medical condition, medical history and response to therapy, and should be decided by your doctor.

The usual initial dose of colchicine for gout during an acute attack is 1 or 1.2 mg. This initial dose is usually followed by half doses of gout medication every hour or full doses every two hours until the pain is relieved, then lowered to .5 or .6 mg every two to three hours. The colchicine dosage may be lowered or stopped if the patient experiences gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea or diarrhea.

The colchicine dosage for gout prevention varies depending on individual circumstances and the number of gout attacks experienced, but is usually between .5 mg three times a week to .6 mg daily.

If you are taking colchicine regularly and you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible. But if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose as usual - don't double dose.


Filed under: Gout and Pseudogout.

Tags: colchicine for gout, gout medication, gout drug, colchicine tablet, generic colchicine, colchicine dosage.


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Gout Risk Facts

June 30, 2011 by Estella.

Knowing your risk of getting gout can help you defeat it. Here, you'll discover key gout risk factors so you can see if you're at risk and what you need to do to eliminate gout. First, to really understand gout risk factors you need to understand the cause(s) of gout…

Gout is caused by high uric acid in the body — a condition known as hyperuricemia — which leads to gout crystals forming in your joints, that cause the symptoms of gout. And uric acid is produced when natural compounds called 'purines' that exist in our bodies and food breakdown during the natural metabolizing process.

So basically, more purines leads to more uric acid, which leads to higher uric acid levels in the body, which then leads to urate crystals in your joints and the agonies of gout. The key gout risk factors can indicate who is more at risk of gout attacks…
- Overweight
- Diet
- Medication Conditions
- Medications
- Family history
- Male and female
- Age

So, for more information on gout causes and symptoms, gout treatment and prevention options, read the full article of Gout Risk Factors - Are You at Risk of Gout? from thegoutsite.com


Filed under: Gout Fact, Gout Risk.

Tags: gout risk factors, gout facts, gout risks, gout medications, gout treatment, gout prevention, colchicine, colcyrs, buy colchicine, colchicine canada .


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What you Need to Know About Gout Medication

June 30, 2011 by Lynn.

Gout is one of the most painful types of arthritis, and can disfigure and damage joints if left untreated. Gout medication falls into two categories - drugs to relieve the pain and inflammation of an attack, and preventive gout medicine to ward off future attacks and avoid complications. Here's what you need to know to make sure you are taking the right medications for your gout:

1) Pain Relievers and Anti-inflammatories

Painkillers, anti-inflammatories and corticosteroids target the pain and inflammation of an acute gout attack. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as naproxen (Aleve), ibuprofen (Advil), indometacin (Indocin), or the newer celecoxib (Celebrex) will ease most gout flare ups in a day or two.

Aspirin should be avoided if you have gout. If you have asthma, heart failure, high blood pressure or kidney problems, talk to your doctor before taking anti-inflammatories.

Oral corticosteroids such as prednisone are very effective in rapidly reducing inflammation and relieving gout pain. Corticosteroids can also be injected directly into the affected joint. Corticosteroids are usually prescribed short-term because of the potential side effects of using it for long periods of time.

If anti-inflammatories don't work well enough, or you are unable to take them, your doctor will likely prescribe colchicine (Colcrys). Colchicine is an extract from a plant called the autumn crocus, also known as meadow saffron. Colchicine has been widely used in many countries since the 1930's, and was FDA approved in combination with probenicid (a gout medication which increases uric acid excretion) in the early 1980's. Colchicine was approved as a solitary gout treatment in 2009 under the brand name Colcrys.

Colchicine can treat gout in two different ways, at higher doses to treat the pain and inflammation of an acute attack, or at lower doses to prevent recurring attacks. While colchicine can reduce the attacks of gout, it does not prevent the accumulation of uric acid that can lead to gout attacks and joint damage.

2) Preventive Gout Medication

Drugs to combat high levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia) work in one of two ways - they either decrease uric acid production, or increase the rate that uric acid is excreted through the kidneys. Uric acid blockers or reducers are prescribed as preventative gout medications, and are not for use during gout attacks. Once prescribed, the patient is usually advised to stay on them for life.

The decision on whether or not to prescribe urate lowering drugs is usually based on:

It's important not to take a uric acid blocker or reducer during a gout attack, but to wait until it has subsided. That's because they may cause an initial increase in uric acid levels, precipitating or worsening a gout attack. Some doctors also prescribe NSAIDs or colchicine for gout when introducing antihyperuricemic drugs to minimize the risk of inducing an acute attack.

Allopurinalis frequently prescribed for chronic gout. Allopurinal is used to prevent, but not treat, gout attacks. It works by decreasing urate production. Allopurinal must be taken daily, and may take 2 to 3 months to become effective. Allopurinol can cause hypertension in some patients, so blood pressure should be monitored.

Probenecid is another uric acid lowering gout medicine that is sometimes prescribed in addition to low dose colchicine. Probenecid helps eliminate excess uric acid through the kidneys into the urine. It's important to drink lots of water when taking probenecid to prevent the formation of kidney stones. Some medications should not be taken along with probenecid, so make sure your doctor is aware of any other drugs you are taking.

Febuxostat is a newer preventative gout medication marketed as Uloric. It was developed specifically to treat gout by decreasing the body's formation of uric acid. It is suitable for patients with impaired kidney function.


Filed under: Gout Medications, What is Gout.

Tags: colchicine, colchicine information, gout medications, gout pain relief, colchicine canada, colchicine.ca .


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